Tips to Keep Your Electric Bill at Bay

electric bill utility rates state energy cost

How To Hack Your Electric Bill

Huffington Post, April 27, 2016

You turn off the lights when you leave a room. You unplug small appliances when they aren’t in use. You think you’re being pretty smart about your energy consumption, yet every month your electric bill keeps creeping up. You shudder to think how high it could go in the summer months — especially if you’re cooling off an apartment or home in Phoenix, AZ, during mid-July. You’re not alone. On average, American households spend $110 a month on their electric bill.

Identify the “energy vampires” in your home
Translation: Simply remembering to turn off your plasma TV isn’t enough. According to Wang, even when it’s turned off, a TV still sucks up 1,400 kilowatt-hours annually, which could mean an extra $150 per year added to your bill. Invest in a smart power strip and plug like-used devices such as TVs, game consoles, and cable boxes into the same one, advises Wang. Not only will the device cut off phantom power, but it can also be set to turn on and off automatically.

Invest in a power monitor to optimize energy usage times
You want to use power when the energy rates are lower and there’s less demand on the power grid,” says Joel Worthington, president of Mr. Electric LLC, an international electrical installation and repair company. A power monitor can help you figure out how much energy you’re using throughout the day so that you can make changes accordingly. For example, you may find it’s more economical to run the dishwasher just before bedtime.

Adjust the temperature of your water heater
According to the U.S. Department of Energy, heating water accounts for 10% to 15% of energy consumption in your home. Most water heaters are preset to 140 degrees, which is way more heat — and expense — than you need. Worthington advises turning yours down to 120 degrees, which can save you 6% to 10% each year on your heating costs. Renters: Don’t try this alone. This is the kind of task that your landlord should handle; ask your landlord to dial it down for you.

Read More